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Teaching low achieving and disadvantaged students by Charles H. Hargis

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Published by Thomas in Springfield, Ill .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Underachievers -- United States.,
  • Children with social disabilities -- Education -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementby Charles H. Hargis.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsLC4691 .H37 1989
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 166 p. ;
Number of Pages166
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2046206M
ISBN 100398055297
LC Control Number88023305

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The First Edition of Teaching Low Achieving and Disadvantaged Students was well received, and so the author, in this new edition, has not altered the ideas expressed there. What he has added are details and reactions in light of events and experiences of the intervening years. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Hargis, Charles H. Teaching low achieving and disadvantaged students. Springfield, Ill.: Charles C Thomas, © This new edition updates and expands the previous volume and continues to reflect the concepts and the reasons behind learning and behavior problems of low achieving and disadvantaged students. Through the chapters, the author describes instructional levels and independent levels, emphasizing that success is produced by finding the place on the curriculum for each student at these : Charles H. Hargis. This new edition updates and expands the previous volume and continues to reflect the concepts and the reasons behind learning and behavior problems of low achieving and disadvantaged students. Through the chapters, the author describes instructional levels and independent levels, emphasizing that success is produced by finding the place on the curriculum for each student at these levels.

Disadvantaged Students and Schools Summary in English Read the full book on: /en • Across OECD countries, almost one in every five students does not reach a basic minimum level of skills. In addition, students from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds are twice as likely to be low performers. LackFile Size: KB. Addressing the needs of low attainers in the classroom 76 Differentiating and ensuring success 76 Varying forms of learner engagement 78 Expectations and challenge 81 Interpersonal relations 82 Teacher-pupil relations 82 Peer relations 85 Summary 87 Chapter 8. Effective Teaching and Learning for LowFile Size: KB. Supporting the attainment of disadvantaged pupils. Briefing for school leaders. November Caroline Sharp, Shona Macleod and Daniele Bernardinelli, National Foundation for Educational Research. Amy Skipp, Ask Research. Steve Higgins, Durham University.   The Sutton Trust’s report states: “The effects of high-quality teaching are especially significant for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds: over a school year, these pupils gain years’ worth of learning with very effective teachers, compared with years with poorly performing teachers.

SUPPORTING DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS AND SCHOOLS Equity and Quality in Education SUPPORTING DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS AND SCHOOLS Across OECD countries, almost one in every fi ve students does not reach a basic minimum level of skills. In addition, students from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds are twice as likely to be low performers. Treat students equally; disadvantaged students can perform to the same standard as their advantaged counterparts and progress to university. Make sure students are signed up to get free meals. Students don’t go hungry, while schools receive extra funding which can be used to further help pupils. Encourage all students to get enough sleep.   *In the sciences, 15 per cent of pupils from disadvantaged communities fell in the and U grade bracket, while only 5 per cent of their more advantage peers didn’t achieve a pass grade in biology, 7 per cent in chemistry and 6 per cent in physics. Those in more disadvantaged areas were also less likely to attain top grades, the analysis shows. According to McREL, there are six classroom strategies that benefit traditionally low-achieving students. These strategies are: 1. Whole classroom instruction – This is where, “the teacher delivers a lesson to a classroom of students all at one time, using constructivist or behaviorist interventions,” says.