EMIGRATION FROM CHINA: A SENDING COUNTRY PERSPECTIVE
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EMIGRATION FROM CHINA: A SENDING COUNTRY PERSPECTIVE by XIANG BIAO

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Published .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Online version of print publicationINTERNATIONAL MIGRATIONv4132003pp24-48

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21024420M

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  Abstract This paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the policies pursued by the People's Republic of China (PRC) regarding the emigration of Chinese by: This paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the policies pursued by the People's Republic of China (PRC) regarding the emigration of Chinese nationals. Most of the available literature on migration management has focused on receiving by:   Emigration from China: A Sending Country Perspective Emigration from China: A Sending Country Perspective Biao, Xiang This paper Author: Biao, Xiang. Demography of Illicit Emigration From China: A Sending Country's Perspective1 Zai Liang2 This paper examines the demographic trends of international migration from China, particularly from Fujian Province in the s and s, comparing the characteristics of emigrants with nonemigrants. This research yields two major findings.

This research yields two major findings. First, Fujian Province became a leading immigrant-sending province in the mids. In this book, distinguished historian Philip A. Kuhn tells the remarkable five-century story of Chinese emigration as an integral part of China's modern history. Although emigration has a much longer past, its "modern" phase dates from the sixteenth century, when European colonialists began to collaborate with Chinese emigrants to develop a. Demography of Illicit Emigration from China: A Sending Country's Perspective. Article. This book tells the political story of how migrants from Morocco and Mexico changed the communities they. Chinese emigration was part of the global wave of mass migration in the nineteenth century. After establishing the main quantities, sources, destinations, and timing of emigration, this article analyses trends in return and female migration, two quantifiable phenomena that are often said to distinguish Chinese from other migrations.

  Abstract This study explores how family characteristics affect the emigration of family members from the city of Fuqing, China, a major migrant-sending area in China. This is an authoritative book on Chinese immigration around the world in the past five hundred s: 6. Overseas Chinese who are ethnically Han Chinese, such as Cantonese, Hoochew, Hokkien, Hakka or Teochew refer to themselves as 唐人 (Tángrén), pronounced tòhng yàn in Cantonese, toung ning in Hoochew, Tn̂g-lâng in Hokkien and tong nyin in lly, it means Tang people, a reference to Tang dynasty China when it was ruling China term is commonly used by the Cantonese.   Assuming that urban residents in China cannot relocate because of hukou restrictions, a viable response by urban residents is to switch occupations. Foged and Peri (), for example, found that refugee-country immigrants caused less-educated “native .